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How the new industrial revolution could help a Detroit – and wider US – upturn

Detroit and the state of Michigan have been in the headlines a lot over the past few years  - mainly as a result of a welter of grim economic news including the city's  slide into bankruptcy.  But more recently have come some signs of a significant  improvement in the fortunes of the region, driven partly by indications of greater optimism and investments by local manufacturers including the big car companies. Among the Michigan manufacturers that have been hiring more workers and expanding production is Fullerton Tool, whose chief executive Patrick Curry is pictured here. Cheered by receiving positive news about their fortunes from Mr Curry and other local business people, I made a speech at an event in Detroit on September 17 examining the health of Michigan-based manufacturing.  The event was organized by the Detroit Manufacturing Renaissance Council, an offshoot of the Chicago Manufacturing Renaissance Council. In the chair was William Jones, chief executive of Focus: Hope, a Detroit community development and human rights group. For background, read this good article by William Hemphill on the manufacturing renaissance movement in the US. YOU CAN DOWNLOAD MY PRESENTATION HERE Detroit Manufacturing Renaissance Council seminar on future for US & Michigan manufacturing, Detroit Read about details of an earlier talk in Chicago at a previous meeting organized by the Chicago manufacturing renaissance council.

Seven reasons we should celebrate manufacturing

By James Woudhuysen, Spiked Online, June 14 2014 Despite the slew of advertising for fashion, cars and appliances, hostility to ‘stuff’ – manufactured products – has grown enormously in recent years. Books have been published in America, Australia and Britain on the subject of what they call ‘affluenza’, the nasty and even infectious side-effects of owning too much stuff. Since 2011, two American corporate high-flyers, Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, have together penned seven books on so-called minimalist consumer habits – quite a feat of trees-to-paper consumption in itself. The London-based futurologist James Wallman has popularised the idea of ‘stuffocation’  – the feeling you get ‘when you look in your wardrobe and it’s bursting with clothes but you can’t find a thing to wear’. And every Christmas, the Guardian denounces consumers for a ‘peculiar form of mental illness’: buying toys, smart cuckoo clocks or mahogany skateboards, and failing to feel guilty about it. Read full article