Peter Marsh is a writer and lecturer on 21st century manufacturing. His best known book is “The New Industrial Revolution: Consumers, Globalization and the End of Mass Production”, published by Yale University Press. Peter gives speeches on how countries and companies can capitalise on the opportunities made possible by the new industrial revolution.  In recent years Peter has given these talks in 16 countries including China, the US, South Korea, Italy and Lithuania. In 2017 Peter’s events included lectures in Brazil and South Africa. In 2015, Peter started Made Here Now, a website about UK manufacturing. From 1983 to 2013 he worked at the Financial Times where his most recent job was manufacturing editor. Peter has a degree in chemistry from the University of Nottingham. His other books have covered microchips (“The Silicon Chip Book“, Abacus), robotics (“The Robot Age”, Abacus) and the space industry (“The Space Business”, Penguin). Before the FT, Peter was employed as a journalist at the Luton Evening Post, Building Design magazine, and New Scientist. Photo: Frederik Jimenez

For speaking events see here

View Videos by Peter
View Photos

 

Observations

UK manufacturing enters a new high-tech phase

by Peter Marsh | 3 March 2014 A series of gleaming machines being assembled on a nondescript Staffordshire industrial estate conjures up something rare – a positive image of the UK’s progress in manufacturing technology. The £400,000 machines are 3D printing devices made by Renishaw, one of Britain’s leading engineering companies. The backing Renishaw has provided for this emerging technology is a bright spot in the UK’s patchy record over the past 30 years in supporting technical innovation in industry. Read full article    

Manufacturing the future: view of the UK in global context

by Martin Earnshaw | 7 March 2013 Even the ghosts of England’s past oppose HS2 it seems. On 10th February 2013 the Observer ran a bizarre story about how HS2 mightgo through a historic battle site from the War of the Roses. The fact that the actual location of the battle is unknown is beside the point it seems. It’s one more reason why it shouldn’t be built. It is churlish, though, to blame the nimbys. Even those building the line show little enthusiasm for the project. Robert Skidelsky writes that the 20 year time frame for building the line “displays an unbelievable lack of energy. Railways can be built much faster than this.” The overwhelming sense that all of this engenders is a sluggish, slow motion decline of Britain compared to the ongoing dynamism of China and the East. When David Smith wrote The Dragon and the Elephant in 2008 he

The changing shape of UK industry

 by Peter Marsh | 3 January 2014 The story of industrial decline in Britain has become so familiar , it takes some effort to realise  that things may not  be so gloomy after all. In fact,British manufacturing is performing well - though not in the traditional ways that most people understand it. As the shape of world manufacturing has shifted over the past 30 years, Britain has altered too and , in many ways, the country is ahead of the game when it comes to the necessary factors for 21st century industrial success. It could turn out to be one of the winners in the new industrial age. From  British industry: a photography special - FT magazine, Jan 4 2014. To read full article, go to http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/c54665e6-6c38-11e3-a216-00144feabdc0.html

 

View on Amazon

Peter Marsh's book is on sale now

The New Industrial Revolution: Consumers, Globalization and the End of Mass Production
View on Amazon